Tag Archives: habitat analogue

Sand lizards move downtown

Conference talk (in German) in Berlin

Die Zauneidechse mag es urban. Was bedeutet das für den Artenschutz und die Stadtplanung?”. Meeting of the Brandenburg Berlin herpetologists in Berlin – more information. If you are interested in our studies on urban effects on sand lizard populations, please read our article “The sand lizard moves downtown – habitat analogues for an endangered species in a  metropolitan area” in Urban Ecosystems.

Treffen der Brandenburg-Berliner Feldherpetologen am 18.02.2017 in Berlin, Herzberge (Informationen und Programm).

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New paper on urban pollinators

Disentangling urban habitat and matrix effects on wild bee species has been published in PeerJ.

Authors Fischer LK, Eichfeld J, Kowarik I & Buchholz S

Abstract In face of a dramatic decline of wild bee species in many rural landscapes, potential conservation functions of urban areas gain importance.  Yet effects of urbanization on pollinators, and in particular on wild bees, remain ambiguous andpollinators not comprehensively understood. This is especially true for amenity grassland and extensively managed wastelands within large-scale residential housing areas. Using Berlin as study region, we aimed to investigate (a) if these greenspaces are accepted by wild bee assemblages as foraging habitats; (b) how assemblage structure of bees and individual bee species are affected by different habitat (e.g., management, flower density) and urban matrix variables (e.g., isolation, urbanization); and (c) to what extend grassland restoration can promote bees in urban environments. In summer 2012, we collected 62 bee species belonging to more than 20 % of the taxa known for Berlin. Urbanization significantly affected species composition of bees; 18 species were affiliated to different levels of urbanization. Most bee species were not affected by any of the environmental variables tested, and urbanization had a negative effect only for one bee species. Further, we determined that restoration of diverse grasslands positively affected bee species richnesss in urban environments. We conclude that differently structured and managed greenspaces in large-scale housing areas can provide additional foraging habitats and refuges for pollinators. This supports approaches towards a biodiversity friendly management within urban regions and may be of particular importance given that anthropogenic pressure is increasing in many rural landscapes.